41° Mostly Cloudy

RED BANK: COAT-FREE IN FEBRUARY

Warm weather made for comfortable busking and strolling in shirtsleeves in downtown Red Bank over the weekend, when daytime temperatures bumped up against or reached 70 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. The outlook for Monday, Presidents’ Day, called for mostly-sunny skies and a daytime peak of about 52. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

RED BANK: SUNRISE AND WEATHER

Thursday’s sunrise on the Greater Green, as seen from Tower Hill Presbyterian Church in Red Bank: that’s the intersection of Harding Road and Prospect Avenue at lower left.

The day began with temperatures around 30 degrees, and under mostly cloudy skies, with the expected daytime peak around 40 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. But the outlook for Friday through Monday, Presidents’ Day, called for mostly-sunny skies and daytime peaks well into the 50’s. (Photo by Trish Russoniello. Click to enlarge.)

ON THE GREEN: HOW MUCH WHITE STUFF?

A coming snowstorm that’s closed schools and government offices is expected to be brief but intense Thursday. As of 6 a.m., with heavy snow reported in northern New Jersey, the rain had just changed to sleet in Red Bank. But the white stuff is expected to begin falling on the Greater Red Bank Green at around 8 a.m. and diminish by early afternoon, with a “most likely snowfall” forecast of 5 to 9 inches, according to the National Weather Service. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

ON THE GREEN: UNUSUAL WARMTH, THEN SNOW

Snow’s coming. Yes, the peak daytime temperature Wednesday is expected to hit 56 degrees, according to the National Weather Service. But that could be followed by “heavy” snow falling at the rate of up to two inches per hour between 3 a.m. and 10 a.m. Thursday.

“The snow should be wet in consistency and therefore will tend to stick to trees and power lines, possibly resulting in some power outages,” the weather service said in a Wednesday morning briefing. “North-to-northwest winds will increase late tonight and Thursday, with gusts in the 30-35 mph range.” (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

ON THE GREEN: NORTHEASTER ARRIVES

rb paddler 012117In chilly, damp weather, a lone paddler took to our beautiful, if grey, Navesink River Saturday afternoon, as seen from Riverside Gardens Park in Red Bank.

The new week begins with even less hospitable conditions for paddling, or much anything else: a northeaster. The National Weather Service forecast for Monday and Tuesday expects a northeaster to bring heavy rain and wind gusts as strong as 65 miles per hour, with coastal flooding. Here’s the full statement on the outlook and hazards from the NWS. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

RED BANK: FIRST SNOW LEAVES A LIGHT COAT

rb-snow-010617A light coat of snow and sprinkling lights alongside the Navesink River in Red Bank made for a pretty vignette Friday morning, in this photo taken from Riverview Towers by a photographer who wished to remain uncredited.

Read More »

RED BANK: FIRST SNOW 0F 2017 IN FORECAST

rb-brine-010417-2
nws-forecast-010517Red Bank’s streets got a treatment of brine Wednesday in anticipation of the first snowfall of 2017, expected to arrive Thursday evening, leaving one or two inches locally, according to the National Weather Service. Meantime, Thursday is expected to be chilly, with temperatures peaking at about 36 degrees. 
(Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

RED BANK: AN ICE START TO WINTER

rb-ice-sculpture-122016A passerby snaps a photo of an ice sculpture Foley Prep installed this week outside its office at the corner of Broad Street and Peters Place in Red Bank Tuesday. But even with the official start of winter with the solstice at 5:44 a.m. Wednesday, how long will the sculpture last? The National Weather Service forecasts that daytime temperatures through Sunday, Christmas Day, will be in the mid- to high-40s. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

NAVESINK: BACTERIAL HOTSPOTS IDENTIFIED

rally-navesink-113016Zach Lees of Clean Ocean Action talks about tracking bacteria along storm sewers upland from Red Bank’s Marine Park Wednesday night.  (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

HOT-TOPIC_03Aided by a trio of specially trained sniffing dogs, environmental detectives have zoomed in on particular locations in three towns that may be at least partly responsible for a recent spike in bacteria levels in the Navesink River, they reported Wednesday night.

At the final Rally for the Navesink event of 2016 organized after a ban on shellfish harvesting from 566 acres of the river last February, a coalition of groups identified specific sites where leaking sanitary sewer lines or septic systems in Red Bank, Fair Haven and Middletown may be contributing bacteria from human waste.

Read More »

ON THE GREEN: RAIN AND FOG DEPART

red-bank-fog-113016Patches of fog lay over Red Bank and the Navesink River Wednesday, as captured from Riverview Towers by a photographer who wished to remain uncredited.

Two days of rain, and one of fog, were expected to end Thursday, initiating a string of partly sunny days through the weekend and into next week, according to the National Weather Service(Click to enlarge.)

ON THE GREEN: GUSTY RAIN IN FORECAST

sandy-hook-nyc-112716Clouds over the New York City skyline, as seen from Sandy Hook Sunday afternoon. Tuesday’s forecast includes periods of rain, with as much as an inch of accumulation possible, and gusting winds of up to 36 miles per hour, according to the National Weather Service(Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

RED BANK: RIVER CONTAMINATION UPDATE SET

rb mbc 092214HOT-TOPIC_03Five months after the series began in response to a sharp increase in fecal coliform contamination, a final Rally for the Navesink event of 2016 has been scheduled. 

Organized by Clean Ocean Action and a handful of environmental advocacy groups, the periodic rallies began in June, attracting sizable audiences and offering both science-heavy updates on water quality and practical tips on keeping pollutants out of the waterway.

Read More »

ON THE GREEN: HAY, NO EXCUSE NOT TO VOTE

shea-forte-110416-2Jeffrey Shea and John Forte made comfortable use of decorative hay bales at the gazebo in Victory Park in Rumson for a chat on a sunny autumn morning last week. 

The forecast for Tuesday, election day, is for sunshine and temperatures peaking in the low 60s, so there’s no excuse in the weather not to vote. Polling stations are open from 6 a.m to 8 p.m. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

ON THE GREEN: STYLISHLY COOL AND BREEZY

fh-election-2016-river-roadWith light layers  that move easily in the breeze, somebody on River Road in Fair Haven is ready for the cool and gusty weather in Monday’s forecast by the National Weather Service.

Speaking of Fair Haven and weather, after its second rain-out Saturday, the borough’s Trucktoberfest will try again this Saturday, but with earlier hours: noon to 7 p.m. There will also be a Halloween angle, as vendors will allow trick-or-treating at their sites, says Councilwoman Susan Sorenson.  (Photo by Trish Russoniello. Click to enlarge.)

ON THE GREEN: A GRAY START TO THE WEEKEND

fh-autumn-colors-102016The vivid colors of autumn, seen here on Ridge Road in Fair on Thursday, are expected to be a bit washed out Friday, when rain, heavy at times, visits the Greater Red Bank Green. As much as an inch may fall, according to the National Weather Service. which could make the “Battle of Ridge Road” football game between Red Bank Regional and Rumson-Fair Haven Regional, in Little Silver, a soggy affair.

The outlook is somewhat better for Saturday, when Fair Haven’s Trucktoberfest — rescheduled from a rainout earlier last month — is slated for Fair Haven Fields. redbankgreen will have more details about that event in a separate post (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

RED BANK: 80 DEGREES? BUTT IT’S AUTUMN!

pumpkin-cheeks-101516A cheeky effigy created using pumpkins at the Warwick Gardens complex in Red Bank makes clear that the season we’re in is autumn. But the National Weather Service forecast, including daytime peak temperatures in the high 70s to low 80s through Thursday, seemed to indicate a return to summer.  (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

RED BANK: JUST A COUPLE OF WORKING SNIFFS

sniffer-dogs-092116-1Scott and Karen Reynolds demonstrate the olfactory talents of Remi, right, and Sable (0bscured) in a conference room at Riverview Medical Center. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

HOT-TOPIC_03The effort to solve the mystery of elevated bacteria levels in the Navesink River is now in the paws of real experts.

Two dogs trained to bark when they smell fecal coliform with a “human signature” have been working the waterfront in Red Bank and Fair Haven in recent days, helping environmentalists and officials source-track fecal coliform contamination, which spikes whenever it rains.

On Wednesday night, the four-footed detectives came to Riverview Medical Center to show several dozen onlookers how it’s done.

Read More »

ON THE GREEN: SUN SETS ON SUMMER

sunset-092116-1The final sunset of summer 2016, as seen on the Navesink River from the Oceanic Bridge linking Rumson and Middletown Wednesday evening. Autumn arrives Thursday at 10:21 a.m.

The new season arrives with plenty of sunshine and a peak temperature in the high 70s, according to the Weather Underground(Photo by Trish Russoniello. Click to enlarge.)

RED BANK: CLEAN NAVESINK PLAN URGED

navesink-anchor-field-090916The Navesink is safe for boating, but that’s a “low bar” for quality, the group told Red Bank officials in a letter. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

HOT-TOPIC_03A consortium of environmentalists, boaters and fishers is urging Red Bank officials to adopt measures to address recent spikes in bacterial contamination of the Navesink River.

As part of what it calls a “no-blame, find it, fix it” effort, the self-styled “Rally for the Navesink” group of seven organizations delivered a “letter to Red Bank” on the issue at Saturday’s Paddle the Navesink event at Maple Cove.

Read More »

ON THE GREEN: WEEKEND WEATHER OUTLOOK

rb-sunrise-090916heat-forecast-090916Clouds lay above our beautiful Navesink River at dawn Friday, as seen from the Oyster Point Hotel in Red Bank. 

The weekend weather outlook for the Greater Red Bank Green includes continued muggy conditions through Saturday, with temperatures peaking above 90 degrees and possible thunderstorms, before we see a return to sunny skies and moderate temperatures Sunday, according to the National Weather Service(Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

ON THE GREEN: TODAY’S LOCAL FORECAST

rb clouds 090716forecast-090816Thick clouds loomed west of Red Bank Wednesday afternoon, as seen from Maple Avenue and West Front Street.

According to the National Weather Service, Thursday’s forecast includes partly cloudy skies, with a slight chance of showers and thunderstorms, and temperatures reaching about 90 degrees. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

ON THE GREEN: HERMINE BYPASSES REGION

hermine 090516Post Tropical Cyclone (formerly Hurricane and Tropical Storm) Hermine, seen from the Long Branch boardwalk Monday afternoon, as the Greater Red Bank Green enjoyed sunshine and soft breezes, untouched by the rain and strong winds of the storm.

Dangerous ocean rip currents remain, however, along with the threat of minor flooding, as the area faces a mostly cloudy day Tuesday, with a chance of rain after 2 p.m., winds gusting as high as 33 miles per hour, and temperatures peaking at around 80 degrees, according to the National Weather Service(Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

SEA BRIGHT: BRACING FOR HERMINE

sb hermine 090416 1StormWatchThe forecasted impacts in terms of both rainfall and tides from Tropical Storm Hermine have been reduced as the storm moved farther east into the Atlantic, the National Hurricane Center announced Sunday morning. Still, “moderate” but widespread coastal flooding is expected with the Sunday night and Monday morning high tides.

In Sea Bright, borough workers were busy removing lockers and completing a berm of sand on the municipal beach Sunday morning.

Elsewhere, Jersey Central Power & Light said it has more than 2,400 linemen, forestry workers and other support personnel standing by should high winds and flooding interrupt service to its central and northern New Jersey customers . (Click to enlarge.)

sb hermine 090416 4