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RED BANK: TABLE DRESSING AT THE GALLERIA

TableSettingisMyLifeWeddingWalkFrame to Please at the Galleria at Red Bank hosts a display of custom-crafted centerpieces for weddings, kids’ parties and other gatherings by Red Bank artist Katie Benson. Benson will be present at a reception from 6:30 to 8:30 pm Thursday, and the items remain on display at the shop’s hallway kiosk through May 31. A portion of sale proceeds will go to Save US Pets. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

 

FAIR HAVEN: AFTER SANDY, INK RUNS AGAIN

Shayne Wolfe, below, and some of the products available at her paper shop, above. (Photo by Alexis Orlacchio. Click to enlarge)

By ALEXIS ORLACCHIO

After Hurricane Sandy barreled though the East Coast and demolished the former Sea Bright location of Ink, a stylish paper and gift boutique, store owner Shayne Wolfe took matters into her own hands.

On May 29, she re-opened shop at 803 River Road in Fair Haven.

Ink provides customers with more than just customized cocktail napkins and guest towels; Wolfe goes above and beyond for her clientele, making every trip to Ink personal.

“I love being able to work with customers – that’s my passion,” said Wolfe, the sole employee of her business. On top of custom printing, Wolfe said she is willing to help with events and parties anyway she can.

“Yesterday I stuffed envelopes for a baby shower with the mother and the daughter who was having the baby, and two days ago I did it with the mother of the bride,” she said. “It’s a really nice way to get to know your customer. There’s a real personal element and you become part of somebody’s life, you become part of a really momentous occasion.”

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UNDRESSING IN THE CHURCHYARD

On the grounds of the First Presbyterian Church at Red Bank, atop Tower Hill, is a wonder of a nature: a paper-bark birch throwing off its clothes in paper-thin layers to reveal something purer underneath.

Red Bank arborist Bill Brooks tells redbankgreen that the exfoliation process occurs “pretty much year-round” for the trees, also known as white birch and canoe birch, because Native Americans used the detritus to waterproof their vessels.

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