BAREFOOT BRIDE FLEES FAIR HAVEN

barefoot-brideWedding gowns line the spacious windows along Monmouth Street. (Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

retail churn smallMayra Perez didn’t get a barefoot-in-the-grass feeling when she bought the Barefoot Bride, then a 40-year-old business, in 2006. None of the neighboring Fair Haven merchants went out of their way to welcome her, she said.

Even after she’d settled into the wedding gown shop, Perez said, she felt isolated. “Fair Haven is just too quiet,” she tells redbankgreen.

By contrast, driving into work every morning through a relatively bustling Red Bank, Perez felt the tug of the familiar. A product of Puerto Rico and the Bronx, where “everybody helped everybody out,” Perez said she sensed her shop was in the wrong place.

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B-BALL TRUE TO YOUR SCHOOL

v-park-bballA couple of Rumson teenagers inspect the newly installed plexiglass backboard and basketball hoop at Victory Park. The borough also repainted the court, from black to green and purple, to reflect local school colors. The court was done in time for the annual summer hoops series “Thursday Night Lights,” an adult basketball recreation program that gets started July 7. (Photo by Dustin Racioppi; click to enlarge)

SOMETHING’S ALWAYS UP IN TRTC’s HOUSE

johndiasTwo River Theater artistic director John Dias presents IN THIS HOUSE, the first in a new series of staged musical readings, beginning Monday night at the Bridge Avenue artspace.

By TOM CHESEK

Things are seldom at a serene standstill inside the Two River Theater, the Bridge Avenue space whose creative team is right now prepping for previews of the latest mainstage production, Candida.

The classic play by George Bernard Shaw makes its Red Bank bow on Tuesday — about which more to come next week in redbankgreen. In the meantime, John Dias, artistic director of Two River Theater Company (the entity that’s the brainy matter within the brick and mortar of the Two River performing arts center) has some equally exciting things happening around the house, from the troupe’s upstairs offices to the street-level “black box” of the Marion Huber room.

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