RED BANK: HUNTING CONDITIONS EGGCELLENT

rb egg hunt 031916 21rb egg hunt 031916 7Escorted as in the past by borough police, the Easter Bunny arrived at Eastside Park in Red Bank Saturday afternoon for an annual Easter Egg Hunt that attracted hundreds of kids, parents… and even a confused robin or two.

Check out our photos after the “read more.”  (Photos by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

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RED BANK: A BIG BUNNY & A BLITZ FOR TREATS

The Easter Bunny hopped into Eastside Park in Red Bank Saturday afternoon, where dozens of kids and parents awaited the second annual Easter Egg Hunt. Here are a dozen photos taken as kids, and some adults, swarmed the field for candy-filled eggs. (Photos by John T. Ward. Mouse-over to pause.)

ON THE HUNT FOR PRETTY EGGS

You have to love an event advertised as “something that will start on time and be over in a flash,” even if the weather drives it indoors, as happened with the annual Easter Egg Hunt at the First Baptist Church of Red Bank Saturday. We’ve got more pics at our Flickr site. (Photos by Peter Lindner. Click to enlarge)

DEER-HUNT LAWS SPUR SHREWSBURY PROTEST

sbury-deerA deer crosses a Shrewsbury street in 2010. (Photo by Peter Lindner. Click to enlarge)

Local and state laws that allow deer hunting closer to housing than in the past drew protesters to Shrewsbury on Sunday, the Asbury Park Press reports Monday.

Led by Sycamore Avenue resident Dede Lichtig, about a dozen protesters from Shrewsbury, Fair Haven, Middletown and elsewhere voiced concern about a shrinking of the deer hunting safety zone passed earlier this year by the state Legislature, as well the borough government’s decision to maintain its hunting law, the Press reports.

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IN SHREWSBURY’S QUIVER, A DEER SOLUTION?

deer-libraryA deer on the lawn of the Monmouth County Library’s Eastern Branch on Route 35 last October. (Photo by Peter Lindner; click to enlarge)

Not a word of objection was uttered Monday night as the governing body of the fed-up-with-deer borough of Shrewsbury gave the nod to the use of bows and arrows to thin burgeoning herds.

Then again, the move was a formality, as the council simply accepted the findings of a report that recommended that frustrated property owners do what they’ve been allowed to do for the past five years: kill the animals with arrows, provided they do so within New Jersey Division of Fish, Game & Wildlife regulations.

Now, the only question is how many residents take the suggestion.

“A few people in town are so fed up, they’re going to do it,” said Mayor Donald Burden, who this year tore out his own vegetable garden in surrender to the white-tailed creatures.

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