LITTLE SILVER: A BARNYARD CELEBRATION

ls-barns-101616-10About 100 Little Silver residents, joined by Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagnols-barns-101616-4, celebrated the completion of restoration work on the three barns at the Parker Homestead Sunday.

The structures, the oldest of which is believed to have been built in the 1790s, and the Parker farm site on which they sit are “as important as Jamestown” in the history of America, Mayor Bob Neff told the crowd.

The restoration, funded with a $250,000 Monmouth County Open Spaces grant, was completed after a dispute with a contractor was resolved and a second contractor, Drill Construction, came on board in January, said Keith Wells, a trustee for the nonprofit Parker Homestead 1665 Inc., the nonprofit that oversaw the project. Two carpenters, Joe Rubel and Mike Cerniglia, were credited for work.

Click the “read more” for additional photos. (Photos by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge.)

Read More »

RED BANK: HOW TO RAISE A FORTUNE

rb fortune house 3 061213The onetime home of journalist T. Thomas Fortune is a National Historic Landmark.  (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

The T. Thomas Fortune Project Committee is reminding all Red Bank area residents that on Friday June 12, the nonprofit organization will host a gala fundraiser at the Marion Huber room at Two River Theater.

Presented from 6 to 10 pm under the theme Finding Fortune: Preserving a National Historic Landmark, the event is the latest in a series of benefits geared toward the ongoing effort to rescue and preserve one of the borough’s genuine historic treasures.

Read More »

RED BANK: FINDING FORTUNE IN HISTORY

TTFHouselogo2015On the evening of Friday, June 12, Two River Theater is the scene as The T. Thomas Fortune Project Committee presents another in a series of fundraiser events. Scheduled for the hours of 6 to 10 pm, the benefit will present a distinguished keynote speaker to be announced — and an opportunity for the greater Red Bank community to become involved with the effort to rescue and preserve one of the borough’s genuine historic treasures.

Located at 94 Drs. James Parker Boulevard, The T. Thomas Fortune House is one of only two National Historic Landmarks in the state of New Jersey (from a total of 57 such sites) with significance to African American heritage. Fortune, the pioneering African American journalist and editor, purchased the home in 1901, giving it the name of Maple Hill — and it was there that he began to do some of his most important work to change the social landscape of America. The Fortune Family remained in the home until 1913, and the property has been unoccupied for several years, falling into disrepair.

Read More »

FEBRUARY IS FORTUNE MONTH IN RED BANK

At their first working session on January 8, 2014, the members of the Red Bank Borough Council unanimously passed a resolution declaring February to be T. Thomas Fortune month in the borough.

The resolution was introduced by Cindy Burnham, who was recently elected to the council. February is nationally designated as Black History Month, and the resolution serves as a formal recognition to a great human rights activist.
Born into slavery, Fortune’s trailblazing rise as a firebrand journalist, publisher and writer rebuked the government’s failed attempt at Reconstruction, which led to the rise of Jim Crow and black code laws. Fortune has been credited with being the bridge to the modern day Civil Rights Movement. In 1880, he formed the Afro American League, which was a pre-curser to the NAACP.

From 1901 to 1911, Fortune resided at the home he called Maple Hill, at 94 West Bergen Avenue (now known as Drs. James Parker Boulevard).  While living there, he entertained such black leaders as Booker T. Washington. He also edited the works of Marcus Garvey while living there.

Read More »