RED BANK: SMITTEN BY SNAKES

Christian Rebscher with a pair of slithery pets in downtown Red Bank. (Photos by Dan Natale. Click to enlarge)

By DAN NATALE

Twenty-nine-year-old Christian Rebscher started keeping snakes seven years ago, when he found an albino rat snake in the woods of northern Middletown. Two feet long and pregnant, it bit him, but he took it home anyway.

“If you feed them and wait a couple days, you can handle them without getting hurt,” he said.

Now, he occasionally shows off his reptiles as he rides his longboard through downtown Red Bank, as he did last Saturday, with the albino and an orange Cream-Sided Corn snake snaking around his neck and arms.

“I love bringing them out because they get a lot of attention” he says. “People are mostly amazed that you can wear snakes around your neck.”

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SHREWSBURY CAT COLONY HEADING TO COURT


The feral cat colony is tucked away in the woods behind a day care center and businesses on Avenue of the Commons. (Photo by Danielle Tepper. Click to enlarge)

By DANIELLE TEPPER

Lurking in the woods adjacent to a day care center on Shrewsbury’s Avenue of the Commons is a group of wild animals that may seem out of place in this suburban enclave better known for its burgeoning deer population.

It’s a colony of feral cats that have claimed the wilderness as their own personal scavenging ground – abetted, authorities contend, by two women who feed them at an improvised encampment built several hundred feet into the woods.

Jeanette Petti of Oceanport and Ruth Rapkin of Tinton Falls are scheduled to appear in municipal court Tuesday on charges that they’re illegally harboring the colony in the woods adjacent to the school.

The pair face misdemeanor allegations they failed to obtain vaccinations and licenses for the felines, and that they are maintaining a nuisance on public and private property, according to summonses issued May 8.

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SEA BRIGHT STRAYS YIELD NO KITTENS

A stray peeks out from a hideaway on the Sea Bright beach earlier this week. (Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

A year after it was launched, a pilot trap, neuter and release program appears to have stopped population growth among Sea Bright’s stray cats in its tracks, proponents say.

No kittens are believed to have been born in the past year among the dozens of felines that inhabit the ocean beach and nearby edge of the Shrewsbury River, says Mayor Dina Long.

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