CHURN: FAST GREEK AND EASY WEDDINGS

lyristis bros 111615Brothers George, Charlie and Taso Lyristis plan to open Greek Eats on the Shrewsbury side of Newman Springs Road Tuesday. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

retail churn smallIn this edition of Retail Churn:

• Three brothers with a long track record as linen-napkin restaurateurs open a fast-food eatery rooted in their Greek heritage Tuesday.

• A wedding planning business that has its roots in a flower shop throws off a new shoot in Red Bank.

• A ginormous pharmacy chain opens a controversial store here.

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CHURN: SHREWSBURY TO GET FAST GREEK EATS

89 ns rd 033015Greek Eats has signed to take the corner space, at right above, at the three-store 89 Newman Springs Road, now under construction. (Photos by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

Rcsm2_010508For about five years, Red Bank restaurateur George Lyristis has been developing an idea for a casual fast-food restaurant based on his ethnic heritage, he tells redbankgreen‘s Retail Churn.

Well, the time has come to make the concept real, he says. With the sale of their Zoe Bistro in Little Silver, effective Wednesday, Lyristis and his brothers Charlie and Taso are planning to open a new place called Greek Eats in Shrewsbury in coming months.

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RED BANK: CINNAMON SNAIL PLAN SQUASHED

cinnamon snail 2 051213Red Bank has seen the last of the Cinnamon Snail, at least until next year’s Farmers’ Market at the Galleria, says mobile chef Adam Sobel. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

Plans for a mobile food truck to set up in downtown Red Bank on Sundays through December have fallen apart as quickly as they came together.

Vegan chef and Cinnamon Snail owner Adam Sobel tells redbankgreen‘s PieHole that town officials threw up bureaucratic requirements Friday that would be impossible to satisfy in time for the truck to operate in the Monmouth Street parking lot of Teak restaurant, as planned.

An unidentified borough employee told a Snail employee that the truck would need a peddler’s permit, the type of license issued to roving ice-cream trucks, Sobel said Saturday afternoon.

“It seems bizarre that we would have to do that just to operate on a different piece of property,” Sobel said. “It’s silliness.”

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RED BANK: LET THERE BE TRUCK FOOD!

cin-snail1The vegan magnet Cinnamon Snail will have a temporary home beside Teak, thanks to a little help from PieHole. (Photo by Peter Lindner. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

PIEHOLE logoAs the final Sunday of this year’s Red Bank Farmers’ Market wrapped up in November, Cinnamon Snail food truck entreprenuer Adam Sobel was confident  he’d be able to continue serving his vegan truck food to loyal followers, telling PieHole that he’d remain at the Galleria parking lot every Sunday through the month of December.

But earlier this week, Sobel put out this urgent message on Twitter:

tweet_cinnamon_500_213.PNG

Now, thanks to the intervention of PieHole, the Snail appears to have found a temporary Sunday home – in downtown Red Bank, a place not seen as friendly to four-wheeled purveyors of fine cuisine.

Is this the breakthrough truck food fans on the Green have been yearning for?

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RED BANK: TEAK CLEARED TO RAISE THE ROOF

The Monmouth Street restaurant plans to offer light fare and cocktails on its second floor, an owner said. (Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

Praised for adding “urban” flavor and criticized for adding to parking woes,  Teak resturant won approval Monday night to build the Red Bank’s first rooftop dining space.

Planning board vice chairman Dan Mancuso, who was on the short end of a 6-2 vote, blasted the expansion, which was alternately described as having a shortfall of 39 and 66 parking spaces.

“I’ve gotta tell you, you’re squeezing every inch out of this property, as the previous owner did,” he told co-owner Charlie Lyristis. “I don’t see this as a win for the town at all.”

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TEAK PLANS SECOND STORY AND DECK

A portion of the addition would allow for open-air dining overlooking Monmouth Street.  (Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

Just over a year after changing hands, Red Bank’s Teak restaurant is blowing through the roof.

The Monmouth Street eatery, with an Asian-fusion menu, has filed a request at the borough planning and zoning office to add a second story with both indoor and outdoor tables.

“My vision is to bring a little bit of Broad Street to Monmouth Street,” says vocal downtown promoter George Lyristis, who with his brothers Taso and Charlie own the Bistro at Red Bank and Zoe in Little Silver. They bought Teak last year with a group that includes Bon Jovi bandmember David Bryan.

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RED BANK RESTAURANTS PLAN PUSHBACK

rb-restaurantsTom Fishkin of Readies Fine Foods, Valerie Aufiero of Front Street Trattoria, Dan Lynch of red and the Downtown, George Lyristis of the Bistro at Red Bank and Anthony Ferrando of Dish are among the restaurateurs planning a new marketing effort. Click to enlarge)

Asbury Park and Pier Village in Long Branch have been eating off Red Bank’s plate for too long.

That’s the message from a group of borough restaurant owners who have banded together in an effort to recapture a bigger piece of the Monmouth County dining-out pie.

After three years of slow build-up, the no-name group is ready to bust out of the Red Bank RiverCenter crib with its own marketing effort aimed at bringing some sizzle back to the downtown.

“Red Bank has really fallen behind,” says red and the Downtown owner Dan Lynch. “We have a really great grouping of restaurants that needs to be showcased.”

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TEAK CHANGES HANDS

teak-042111Restaurateur George Lyristis, below, says he and others bought the restaurant to keep it from going under. (Click to enlarge)

An investment group led by Bistro at Red Bank owner Lyristis_george_2George Lyristis has acquired the Monmouth Street “Asian fusion” restaurant Teak.

The restaurateur, who with his brothers Taso and Charlie also owns Zoe in Little Silver, said he and two partners bought Teak because they were concerned that the restaurant would fail, leaving another gaping hole in the downtown streetscape in the way Ashes Cigar Bar did on Broad Street with its collapse under the weight of litigation did last summer.

“I didn’t want to see another domino fall,” Lyristis tells redbankgreen.

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