RED BANK: BOOKMARKS MARK FAVORITES

St. James first-grader Declan Duffy chose to draw Red Bank’s Molly Pitcher Inn as his favorite place in town, above. Below, the other winners by grade. (Click to enlarge)

[Press release from the Friends of the Red Bank Public Library]

The Sixth Annual Friends oft he Red Bank Public Library Bookmark Contest has announced this year’s winners!  At a well-attended party on May 20, the Friends presented the winners with certificates and gift cards to local businesses.

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RBR AWARDS LETTERS TO ACADEMIC STARS

officialacademicvarsitylettersofficialPress release from Red Bank Regional High School

At its February board meeting, the Red Bank Regional (RBR) Board of Education honored its highest achieving academic stars with their very own Varsity Letter. The tradition began many years ago when the school district sought to encourage and honor academic excellence the same way it honors its top athletic achievements, with a varsity letter. In order to earn an Academic Varsity Letter, students must maintain a straight A in every marking period of the preceding year (September of 2014 through June of 2015 in this case).

According to Red Bank Regional High School Guidance Director Dawn Kaszuba,The overall GPA average for this group was 98.04. They are not content to get the 90, but rather strive to achieve their very best…in many ways.

“In addition to being great students, these kids are also peer tutors, athletes and overall well-rounded and committed members of the RBR community.”

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RED BANK: ANIME FANS GET CREATIVE

anime 1Librarian Stephanie Chadwick with participants in last month’s meeting of the anime club. Below, details of some mangas. (Photos by Isabel Halloran. Click to enlarge)

By ISABEL HALLORAN
Red Bank Charter School Intern

anime 3Four teenagers – Angela, Monteleone, Sam, and Alberto –  gather in a small room at the Red Bank Public Library and sit at a long table.

Across from this table is another lined with manga (pronounced MAHN-guh), Japanese comic books that often have a fantasy or sci-fi theme to them. These books are read from what we in the United States consider back-to-front.

Stephanie Chadwick, teen services librarian and group leader, welcomes the participants to the monthly meeting of the Anime Club and introduces the activity for the day: playing a game she calls “anime-opoly.”

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