TOWN TO EAT NEW BRICK, BUT NOT THE OLD

fh-sidewalk
Existing brick sidewalks along Fair Haven Road, above, will be reset after the street and curbs are redone. Concrete sidewalks will be replaced with brick at the town’s expense.

Fair Haven’s on-and-off affinity for brick sidewalks is on again as preparations begin for a repaving of Fair Haven Road, a thoroughfare that once glistened with oyster shells.

But the business of looking back while looking ahead isn’t limited to reanimating the quaint look of centuries past. Some residents think the town should reimburse them for personal outlays for sidewalks of both brick and concrete that are of a more recent vintage.

Read More »

HALFACRE TO MAKE D.C. RUN OFFICIAL

halfacre-1-01-08Now in his third year as mayor, Mike Halfacre has set his sights on a seat in Congress.

After months of testing-the-waters fundraising, Fair Haven Mayor Mike Halfacre plans to make his run for Congresss official on Tuesday.

The conservative Republican has scheduled press conferences in his hometown and in Trenton to announce his challenge to incumbent 12th-district Democrat Rush Holt next year.

Read More »

CENTURY HOUSE EYED FOR POCKET PARK

fh-williamshouseWith its million-dollar view of the Navesink, the Charles Williams house would be razed sooner or later, locals appear to agree. Below, a weathered medallion on the doorframe marks the structure as a Century House.
(Click to enlarge)

It’s a homestead that links Fair Haven not only to its roots as a riverfront village, but to the bedrock of its identity as a place where African Americans made their homes even in the days of slavery.

The Charles Williams house, built overlooking the Navesink River in 1855, has remained in the same family without interruption, pre-Emancipation right through the death of its most recent occupant, who lived there for 90 years.

Her name was Winifred Julia Decatur Robards, and she died one year ago this week at the age of 92, adding to the rapid erosion of the borough’s small black community.

But years before her death, she and her two sons saw the end of the line coming, and planned to put the house up for sale. And now, it appears the Williams house will indeed fall to a bulldozer at the behest of its next owner: the borough of Fair Haven itself.

Read More »