RED BANK: BACKYARD BBQ GRILL EXPLODES

rb fire 122215 1A pair of explosions audible from blocks away brought out the Red Bank Volunteer Fire Department shortly after 10 p.m. Tuesday night. Deputy fire chief Pete DeFazio, responding to a report of an explosion in a propane-fueled barbecue grill at 95 South Street, witnessed the second explosion, which he said sent a flame about 15 feet into the air. He put the resulting fire out with an extinguisher, he said.

The owner of the home, Tim Carr, told firefighters he had shut the grill down about two hours earlier, authorities said. An investigation into the cause was underway. 

No one was injured and there was no structural damage, said Chief Joe Lauterwasser. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

 

BACK TO THE SCENE OF THE FIRE

smolderingRed Bank firefighters returned to the site of Monday’s night’s house fire after a report of smoldering in the attic early Tuesday afternoon. The remaining embers of the South Street blaze, reported to have been started by the homeowner as he sought to remove a wasp’s nest, were quickly extinguished, fire personnel reported. (Click to enlarge)

TARGETING WASPS, OWNER SETS HOUSE AFIRE

south-st-house-fireSmoke pours from the gable end of the attic at 96 South Street. Below, homeowner Peter Chan with borough Fire Marshal Stanley Sickels. (Click to enlarge)

chanA smoky fire damaged a Red Bank residence Monday night after the homeowner tried to burn an insect nest, authorities said.

The fire, at 96 South, was reported at about 9:45 p.m., and appeared to be out by about 10:20.

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OLDEST HOME GETS ITS HISTORICAL DUE

white-house1Red Bank’s oldest house, on South Street, was finally put on the state’s list of historic places last week. (Photo by Dustin Racioppi; click to enlarge)

By DUSTIN RACIOPPI

A tour of Mary Gilligan’s South Street home is, quite literally, a trip back in time, starting with the walk up the driveway, as you take a look at the white Dutch Colonial. The upstairs windows, shrunken versions of the ones downstairs, are the first sign that something is different about this house.

Is that a one-story or two-story? Actually, it’s a one-and-a-half story.

Then you walk through the front door, which can only be unlocked with a skeleton key, and walk on wide wooden floor boards that have been there since the 1790s. Through a couple short doorways — “For anybody above my height, the rule is, watch your head,” the vertically-challenged Gilligan said — to the kitchen, where Gilligan uses a wooden chopping block and slaughter table, which have been in the home for centuries, to store various kitchen items. Eighteenth century families did not have CuisinArt collections or varieties of Swiffer’s to amass, so storage space is at a premium in Gilligan’s home.

“The hope is to have more cabinets so I can actually put things away,” she said.

One project at a time. Her most recent feat came last week when the house, the oldest in Red Bank, was accept to the New Jersey Register of Historic Places, an endeavor six years in the making.

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