RED BANK: OPEN-AIR STAIR MAY BE ENCLOSED

Designed by Red Bank architect Jerome Morley Larson in the 1970s, the open-air stairway would be enclosed as shown below if the plan is approved.  (Photo by John T. Ward; rendering by SOME Architects. Click to enlarge)

[UPDATE: The planning board hearing on this proposal has been rescheduled to February 2.]

By JOHN T. WARD

7 broad elevation 011617For the second time in less than four years, proposed changes to one of downtown Red Bank’s most distinctive buildings are slated for review by the borough zoning board Thursday night.

The plan for 7 Broad Street calls for enclosing the building’s unusual open-air staircase and refacing the building as shown at right, along with converting second-floor offices to apartments.

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RED BANK: LITTLE KITCH ORGANIC DREAMS BIG

kitch 092815 8Kitch Organic partners Rick Ivone, left, and Joe Durso beneath the pyramidal skylight in their new Leighton Avenue eatery, which features its own garden along Catherine Street, below. (Photos by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

kitch 092815 3With a skylight reminiscent of the Louvre illuminating the impeccable interior and a design-conscious herb-and-vegetable garden out back, the new Kitch Organic restaurant on Red Bank’s West Side would stand out in any town.

But the fact that it replaces a liquor store remembered without fondness for serving minors while the occasional hooker milled about outside adds a dimension of change to a project that its owner hope will have all kinds of reach: social, economic, and more than anything else, nutritional.

Yeah, Rick Ivone and Joe Durso are thinking big. And they’ve put their money on the table to make it happen.

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RED BANK: ANOTHER RESTAURANT APPROVED

18 broad 061315At 18 Broad Street, now concealed by scaffolding, the Art Deco foyer seen below will be replaced by one more reminiscent of the building’s 19th-century origins, the architect said. (Photos by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

18 broad 040615Accelerating downtown Red Bank’s flight from retail to food, the zoning board approved the conversion of a longtime shoe store to a restaurant Thursday night.

Dominating the two-hour hearing were two issues: whether the new owner of 18 Broad Street should be permitted to have three apartments upstairs, rather than the two allowed under the zoning ordinance, and whether the Art Deco foyer should be saved or replaced.

Barely mentioned: the impact of the 76-seat restaurant on parking.

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RED BANK: FOCUS ON FOYER WINDOWS

18 broad 040615The foyer of the former If the Shoe Fits store is the last remaining example of Art Deco design downtown, say preservationists. (Photos by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

[UPDATE: The zoning board meeting on the 18 Broad Street proposal was cancelled. The application was rescheduled for June 18.]

18 broad 010715A proposal to turn a former downtown Red Bank shoe store into a restaurant and replace its distinctive curved-glass entryway is slated for review at Thursday night’s zoning board meeting.

Preservationists have raised concerns about the plan for 18 Broad Street, which is located in the historic district, because, they say, it would eliminate the last remaining example of Art Deco design in the commercial district.

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RUMSON: CRAFT BEERS AND A SOUVENIR

100914 maguire1John Mayer pours a pint of Starr Hill Sabbath Black IPA. Below, souvenir glasses available to the first 24 customers of the night. (Photo by Susan Ericson. Click to enlarge)

By SUSAN ERICSON

100914 maguire2Beer enthusiasts have some serious decisions to make at Molly Maguire’s Gastropub in Rumson.

“Twenty-one choices on tap, plus bottled beers from all over, if you’re not really a tap person,” says Kathy Maguire, who owns the East River Road establishment with her husband, Mike. “We also have a gluten-free beer.”

Thursday nights at the former Murray MacGregor’s, now beginning its fourth year under the Maguire flag, have become particularly interesting to beer lovers: a different craft beer is tapped each week. And as an added incentive, the first two dozen customers can bring home a beer glass bearing the brand of the featured suds. Empty, of course.

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RED BANK: ORGANIC TAKEOUT GOOD TO GO

kitch organic 090414 1A pyramidal glass skylight and other touches would transform the former deli and liquor store shown below. (Photos by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

kitch organic 090414 2Red Bank’s zoning board gave unanimous approval Thursday night to a plan by Kitch Organic to turn a vacant neighborhood deli and liquor store on the West Side into an organic take-out restaurant.

The new business will deliver pre-ordered meals, allow for pick-ups but offer no onsite dining at the former home of Best Liquors, co-owner Rick Ivone told the board.

The dowdy one-story building, at the corner of Leighton Avenue and Catherine Street, will also get a a makeover that includes a glass pyramid skylight, extensive plantings and an herb garden out back.

“Aesthetically and functionally, it will be far superior to what’s there now,” planning consultant James Higgins told the board.

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RED BANK: LOOKING GLASSY, 7 BROAD

A plan to remove an exterior staircase and enclose the facade in glass was approved after changes requested by the zoning board.  (Click to enlarge)

By SARAH KLEPNER

Another building on Red Bank’s Broad Street will be getting the glass-front treatment, though with less than originally proposed.

Having raised objections to earlier plans that included a fishbowl scenario of wall-to-wall glass for two bedrooms and a living room in a proposed second-floor residence, the zoning board last week approved several variances for a revised set of plans for 7 Broad Street.

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INLAID-GLASS SIDEWALK ENDS LONG RUN

A stretch of glass-embedded sidewalk on Monmouth Street is slated for removal. Below, Teresa Manning with a sample of the original glass. (Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

Easily overlooked by the hundreds of pedestrians who walk on it every day, a distinctive stretch of Red Bank sidewalk is about to vanish.

Running along the front of 37-43 Monmouth Street, the century-old sidewalk is inlaid with hundreds of thick squares of purple-tinged glass arranged in neat grids.

For observant walkers, the sidewalk is curiosity underfoot. For the tenants of the building fronted by it, and whose cellars extend underneath it, the sidewalk has been a source of eerie subterranean illumination.

“The light from outside would come right in,” said Teresa Manning, business manager for Rocar Properties, which owns the building.

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