CLIPPINGS: IN THE PINK

CLIPPINGS_220 All over the Green  and beyond, even – towns are highlighting the importance of breast cancer detection by painting themselves pink this month. Here are some snippets from downtown Red Bank’s contribution.  (Video by Gerda Liebmann. Click to pause.)

Check out all the Clippings from the Green here.

Gerda Liebmann bio

GROCERY SCION DONATES $1M TO RIVERVIEW

The gift puts Riverview’s campaign to pay for a new day-stay surgery center past its $15 million goal. (Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

A Navesink couple is the latest in a string of wealthy donors to write a whopping check to help pay for a new surgical center at Riverview Medical Center in Red Bank, the hospital announced late Tuesday.

Richard Saker, the third-generation CEO of the Saker ShopRite chain, and his wife, Laura, have donated $1 million to the cause through the business, the hospital reports.

The commitment pushes the hospital’s campaign for the 22,000-square-foor surgery center “well past” its $15 million goal, the nonprofit said in its announcement.

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RIVERVIEW GETS PASS ON KIDNEY-STONE SUIT

hot-topic left smallNew Jersey’s state appeals court has upheld the dismissal of a lawsuit brought by a back-injury patient who claimed doctors at Riverview Medical Center failed to inform him of x-rays showing he also had a large kidney stone.

In its decision of last Thursday, the Appellate Division ruled that a Superior Court judge was correct to dismiss a medical negligence claim by John Cifaretto, who underwent a series of treatments for the stone and claimed he suffered permanent kidney damage.

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ART AND ABOUT: SOME GRIEF, SOME JOY

riverviewmckay

Works in multiple media — created by anonymous young participants in the Children’s Art Therapy Program at Riverview Medical Center — are spotlighted for one week only at McKay Imaging Gallery.

By TOM CHESEK

For more than a generation now, the Children’s Art Therapy Program at Riverview Medical Center has been helping the youngest members of families impacted by death and serious illness, by providing a beneficial and creative way to channel and express their feelings — using a daub of paint, a glob of clay or a tub of crayons.

Initiated in 1980 by veteran nurse Helen Riegelman, the program was actually one of the first of its kind in the Northeast. And 30 years on, the CAT program has quietly helped more than 2,500 kids whose lives have been touched by sudden loss, chronic or terminal illness. Here in the 30th anniversary month of October, program coordinator Jane Weinheimer has made things a little less quiet — with several public exhibits drawn from the CAT’s private files, including a display that briefly takes over the walls of one of Red Bank’s most eclectic galleries.

It’s one of nearly a dozen art events happening in and around the greater ‘green in October, and we’ve got the full rundown.

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