RUMSON: SHINING LIGHT ON LUMINARIES PAST

roberta van anda 051315 2 Roberta Van Anda in her Rumson study, above, and her newly published book, below. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

rumson legendsRoberta Van Anda is moving out of Rumson soon, capping more than 60 years of borough residence in which she was a longtime school board member, a wife, a mother and writer of a town newsletter.

She’s leaving as a newly published book author. Her “Legendary Locals of Rumson,” one in a nationwide series focused on particular locales, debuted this month. And it fulfills Van Anda’s long-held desire to tell her contemporaries, and perhaps future borough residents, about the contributions made to the community by predecessors whose names may have vanished over the years.

“I’m just so excited to bring some of these people out of the shadows of history,” she told redbankgreen recently.

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UNEASY PEACE LIVES ON IN OLD GRAVEYARD

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By EVAN SOLTAS

While it gets attention from a few devoted visitors, there’s a distinct sense that the Rumson Burying Ground has been largely forgotten by the public.

Cars whip by on Rumson Road, but time here isn’t measured in minutes and seconds. One sees its passage in the dark stains on headstones, in the termite tubes that have slowly consumed one of the site’s remaining wood grave markers, and in the haunting inscriptions that date back to 1722.

Captain Hartshorne Price, died 1849.

Eleazer Parmly, died 1842.

Huldah Borden, died 1883.

For all its stillness, however, the graveyard at the corner of Conover Lane has been dragged – not for the first time – into the modern world by a dispute over its maintenance.

Dead men may tell no tales, but here, they are not entirely silent.

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BOROUGH WINS PERMIT-PARKING LAWSUIT

Hudson_parking_red_bankThe ordinance upheld in the case was largely aimed at addressing concerns raised by Hudson Avenue residents about postal workers.

Red Bank has defeated a legal challenge to its authority to create residential permit-parking zones.

Superior Court Judge Lawrence Lawson last week issued a decision that rejected the arguments by a lawyer for Tai Truong, a mail carrier who contended that such a zone on Hudson Avenue was unconstitutional.

The 20-page decision, which follows a one-day trial in Freehold in March, also found that the borough had not improperly conferred special rights on Hudson Avenue residents.

“The courts give a huge amount of deference to everything that municipalities do,” attorney Bill McCarter tells redbankgreen.

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