RED BANK: RESTAURANT, BOUTIQUE IN CHURN

Jack Pongnoo in the former Readie’s space, where he’s opening a new restaurant. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

retail churn smallSummer doldrums? Not in Red Bank, where storefront turnover continues as busily as ever.

This edition of redbankgreen‘s Retail Churn has the scoops on:

• a new southeast-Asian restaurant coming to Broad Street

• an update on the former Katsin’s Pharmacy space on Shrewsbury Avenue

• a new women’s clothing boutique

• the departure of a vacuum-cleaner shop, and more.

It’s all Churning right around the ‘read more’ corner…

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WHAT’S FOR LUNCH? A READIE’S FISH FRY

The Buena Place fish fry combo platter, a recent addition to the menu at Readie’s Cafe. (Photo by Susan Ericson. Click to enlarge)

By SUSAN ERICSON

Restaurants come and go in Red Bank, maybe more often than we like. But there are a few that can brag of longevity and customer loyalty.

Opened in 1957, Readie’s Café is celebrating a big anniversary this year. Tom Fishkin, owner since 2001, tells PieHole that the deli had its launch on Monmouth Street as the Village Pork Store the same year that Elsie’s Subs, another lunchtime institution, opened its doors. It became Readie’s Fine Foods under owner Jack Readie in the 1980s.
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RED BANK: SHOP LOCAL EATERS GIFT GUIDE

readies 111313

PIEHOLE-GIFT_MED

PieHole knows that local foraging is the best foraging. For the food lovers on your gift list we have assembled 12 Days of PieHole’s First Annual Shop Local Holiday Food & Drink Gift Guide. This is the 4th in the series.

Back in the day, when it was on Monmouth Street in Red Bank, Readie’s was a German butcher. Though it’s now a deli on Broad Street, the shop still has some old-time customers who like the German flavorings, and these German cocoa biscuits remain popular, says owner Tom Fishkin. And they fit in well with his gift-basket business. $3.50.

RED BANK: FOR LUNCH? SOUP WITH BITE

readie's 111513Vegetable barley soup, with a kick. We had it with turkey on a roll. (Photo by John T. Ward. Click to enlarge)

By JOHN T. WARD

morsels mediumThe vegetable barley soup PieHole ordered at Readie’s Deli in Red Bank last week delivered a surprising spicy jolt.

Turns out that was the first time Readie’s had ever made the soup, owner Tom Fishkin told PieHole.

“I said, ‘Hey, why don’t we make some vegetable barley soup today?'” he recalled saying to his cook, Elid Cruz, that morning. “Elid said, “Ok, what’s in it?’ I said, “Well, start with some vegetables… and barley.'”

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COLORFUL FUN FOR KIDS ON MONMOUTH


Marissa Porskievies squirts a sampling of primary colors into a palette at her store’s “paint station.”
 (Photo by Stacie Fanelli. Click to enlarge.)

By STACIE FANELLI

Rcsm2_010508Marissa Porskievies envisions her new Red Bank shop, Paint a Tee, as a  kid-friendly destination, though there isn’t anything to throw, jump on, slide down or win.

The shop, taking over the former Readies delicatessen location at 18 Monmouth Street when it opens in a few weeks, will sell blank T-shirts, tote bags, puzzles, placemats and more – all to be designed by customers, who might range from 3-year-olds celebrating a birthday to business associates enjoying a ladies’ night out.

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READY FOR THE NEXT TENANT

jack-readieretail churn smallJack Readie scraped his own name off the window of the storefront that was home to his meat shop on Monmouth Street in Red Bank for many years Thursday.

The business, which was born as the Village Pork Store in 1957 and taken over by Readie in the 1980s, has been owned for the last 11 years by Tom Fishkin. Still called Readie’s, it moved to Broad Street in September.

“I’m not even thinking about” the end of an era, Readie told redbankgreen, adding that he has two strong prospects as tenants for the space. (Click to enlarge)

RED BANK RESTAURANTS PLAN PUSHBACK

rb-restaurantsTom Fishkin of Readies Fine Foods, Valerie Aufiero of Front Street Trattoria, Dan Lynch of red and the Downtown, George Lyristis of the Bistro at Red Bank and Anthony Ferrando of Dish are among the restaurateurs planning a new marketing effort. Click to enlarge)

Asbury Park and Pier Village in Long Branch have been eating off Red Bank’s plate for too long.

That’s the message from a group of borough restaurant owners who have banded together in an effort to recapture a bigger piece of the Monmouth County dining-out pie.

After three years of slow build-up, the no-name group is ready to bust out of the Red Bank RiverCenter crib with its own marketing effort aimed at bringing some sizzle back to the downtown.

“Red Bank has really fallen behind,” says red and the Downtown owner Dan Lynch. “We have a really great grouping of restaurants that needs to be showcased.”

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MIXED REACTIONS FOR NEW METER RATES

meterfeeder11Matthew Shubitz thumbs through a handful of change Friday to round up enough to satisfy Red Bank’s new meter rates. (Photo by Dustin Racioppi)

By DUSTIN RACIOPPI

It’s been a little more than a month since Red Bank doubled curbside parking meter rates downtown, jacking the fees from 50 cents and hour to a dollar.

Borough officials made the move, which also included a 33-percent increase to permit fees, in part to put a tourniquet on a $10,000-a-month bleed from town coffers that began when free Saturday parking took effect in early 2009.

So how has it been working out?

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RED BANK PASSES PARKING-FEE HIKES

broad-metersCome April, on-street parking will cost twice as much downtown. (Photo by Dustin Racioppi)

By DUSTIN RACIOPPI

Red Bank officials formally put a higher premium on downtown parking Monday night, passing an ordinance that will double on-street parking fees and raise the cost of parking permits by 33 percent.

The changes, boosting street meter rates to $1 an hour and permit costs to $800 a year, will take effect April 1. At a projected $203,000 increase in revenue for the borough, the meter and permit hike is expected to more than make up for a painful shortfall of about $10,000 a month resulting from the borough’s indefinite moratorium on charging for Saturday parking.

Despite its potentially fractious nature, the council faced virtually no pushback from the public.

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