Search Results for: citarella

RED BANK: BURGLARY AT MARKET REPORTED

AUTHORITIES_RB-2016-v3Red Bank police are investigating a burglary that occurred late Saturday night or early Sunday morning at Citarella’s Market on Prospect Avenue, Chief Darren McConnell tells redbankgreen.

McConnell said the burglar or burglars forced their way into the shop through the front door and stole a small amount of cash. An investigation is underway, he said. 

BUTCHERS TALK TURKEY BREASTS

turkey The Green’s butchers suggest customers get their Thanksgiving orders in by this Thursday. (Photo by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

morsels medium

With Thanksgiving just over a week away, ’tis the season to talk turkey with a couple of The Green’s butchers.

PieHole checked in with Red Bank’s Citarella’s Market and Monmouth Meats and came away with a well-rounded education on breasts.

We learned, for one thing, that not everyone needs a whole turkey for Thanksgiving.

Read More »

LARDER: FOR TRUE BACON, VISIT A BUTCHER

bacon_kyle_citarellas2 Kyle Powell at Citarella’s Market in Red Bank shows PieHole some real-deal bacon. (Photo by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

LARDER-270_100414No food is more debased than bacon. Certainly other food crimes abound: eggs are regularly subject to the atrocity of having their yolks forcibly removed before being whipped into the horror known as an egg-white omelet, or an enterprising chef may serve a mid-winter Caprese salad with a mealy, flavorless, pink imposter of a tomato.

But bacon — mankind’s crowing alchemic achievement of pig and smoke; indeed our pinnacle of pork preservation — is subject to a constellation of abuses on flagrant display at grocery stores on the Green and beyond.

Refrigerator cases scream with nightmares like “turkey bacon” or “pre-cooked bacon” (which frankly sounds like an Orwellian conceit to save us from the “trouble” of making bacon — these same hucksters are no doubt working on a way to bring babies into the world without the “trouble” of sex.) Read More »

RED BANK: PEPPERS, PICKLED AND PACKED

marc dostie 100316Stuffing 50 or so pickled cherry peppers with proscuitto and provolone goes faster with an assist from helpful neighbor Marc Dostie. Photo by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

morsels mediumWe’ve had our crop of cherry peppers from the backyard garden pickling in the refrigerator for a couple weeks now, and decided that it was high time we stuffed them with something to make them even more delicious.

Prosciutto-and-provolone-stuffed cherry peppers sounded like a good idea.

Read More »

PIEHOLE: KARMA, CUPCAKES & PAD KRA PROW

citarella butcher picksAnother tasty pick for your weekend grilling pleasure in our continuing series on cuts you’ll only find at a real butcher shop. (Photo by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

morsels medium

redbankgreen’s PieHole is all about local food and drink. If you haven’t liked us on Facebook yet or followed us on Twitter, you may have missed some of these recent stories…

 

 

RED BANK: HANGER STEAK FOR YOUR GRILL

citarella butcher picksKyle Powell shows of a well-trimmed Hanger Steak at Citarella’s Market in Red Bank. (Photo by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

morsels mediumAs grilling season heats up, PieHole is checking in with area butchers to see what special cuts they like to set aside for themselves to bring home and put on their grills.

You are not going to find any of these shrink-wrapped in your local grocery store’s meat case. In fact, lesser-known cuts like these are exactly the reason PieHole prefers to shop at the Green’s local butchers: affordable, great tasting cuts that we’ve never heard of before.

This week, PieHole checks in with Kyle Powell at Citarella’s Market in Red Bank. Powell tells PieHole that one of his favorite cuts for the grill, the hanger steak, is a piece of meat that used to be ground up or just tossed aside.

Read More »

RUMSON: CHEFS’ TIPS FOR YOUR CORNED BEEF

corned_beef_okeefe_uragaEddie O’Keefe (left) and Molly Maguire’s chef Alfredo Uraga explain to PieHole why brined beef brisket shrinks when cooking. (Photo by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

morsels medium

With St. Patrick’s Day less than a week away, the Green is about to go extra-Green. And as is the custom elsewhere, the Irish Diaspora here will celebrate the feast day of this Christian saint by eating…  a nice koshered Jewish brisket?

Well, sort of.

Read More »

WHAT’S FOR LUNCH? SOPPRESSATA ‘N CHEESE

whatsforlunch_soprasettaSoppressata from Citarella’s Market paired with some pickled cherry peppers from the garden and a piece cheddar cheese.  (Photo by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

morsels mediumCitarella’s Market in Red Bank carries a few different cured dry sausages that they bring in from Pastosa’s in Brooklyn.

PieHole recently picked up a sweet soppressata (approx $15 per pound) from the Prospect Avenue shop. At home, we put together a quick lunch with some pickled hot cherry peppers from this summer’s garden and a piece of cheddar leftover from a recent party.

Read More »

RED BANK: GETTING FRESH WITH TURKEY

turkey

The sign outside Citarella’s Market in Red Bank says it all. If you want a fresh turkey, the clock is ticking. Below, Kristian Bauman, meat manager at Sickles Market in Little Silver. (Photos by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

Kristian BaumanThanksgiving is less than three weeks away, and so now is the time to think about where you’re going to get your turkey for the big day.

If possible, you’re going to want to go with a fresh bird, not one that’s been doing hard, cold time frozen away in some industrial freezer.

“Sometimes those turkeys have been in the supermarket’s freezer for a year or so,” says Stew Goldstein, of Monmouth Meats in Red Bank. “The stores buy when the price is low, and then keep the birds in their freezers ’til it’s time to sell them. Who knows really how long it’s been in there?”

One thing dinner tables around the Red Bank Green can be thankful for is the number of options we have for getting fresh turkeys. Piehole checked in with three shops to talk fresh turkey.

 

Read More »

RED BANK: GENERATIONS OF MEATY WISDOM

Fourth-generation butcher Ralph Citarella, right, and long-time employee Kyle Powell carry on more than 113 years of meat-cutting tradition. (Photo by Jim Willis. Click to enlarge)

By JIM WILLIS

Bites1_SmallJust as in the Middle Ages, when last names like Baker, Taylor and Miller connoted the trade or profession of the family breadwinner, if “Citarella” were an occupation, it would now mean “dude who knows meat.”

In the late 1800s, Andrew Ralph Citarella left Naples, Italy, to settle in Red Bank, and soon began selling meat off of his front porch.

“He learned to cut meat by just doing it,’ says Ralph Citarella, fourth-generation butcher and current owner of Citarella’s Market, on Prospect Avenue. “Then he sent my great-grandmother [Carmela] to the meat houses [in Long Branch]. She learned the proper way, and then she taught him.

“So she taught my great-grandfather, and he taught my grandfather, and my grandfather taught my father, who taught me. It’s like an apprenticeship. It’s just years of a cutting apprenticeship.”

From the front porch, the first Citarellas moved to a store on Bridge Avenue in Red Bank. Sometime later, the shop relocated to Sea Bright, where Ralph’s grandfather and father, Andy, ran the business. The 1962 flood brought another relocation, to the Little Silver Shopping Center, where Andy ran the store. But in 1979, “he had to get out of there, because at that time it was really run-down, and the rent was going up, so he moved the store” to its current location, said Ralph. “He ‘moved a mile north,’ as he used to put it.”

redbankgreen sat down with Ralph at a picnic table beside the store recently to talk about meat, sauce and what makes a 100- plus-year-old family business tick.

Read More »

COPS: CRIME SPREE INCLUDED BUTCHER SHOP

hot-topic rightThe expanding set of charges against accused burglar Carl VonPier of Fair Haven has grown yet again, this time to include a Red Bank business among his alleged victims.

The 19-year-old Fair Haven man has now been charged by Red Bank police with burglarizing Citarella’s Market on Prospect Avenue last month.

VonPier was arrested in Colts Neck on July 27 after police apprehended him during an alleged break-in attempt at the Colts Neck Shopping Center.

Read More »

STEW MEAT: ‘IT’S NOT GOING TO BITE YOU’

Goldstein, StewLenny, er, Stew Goldstein of Monmouth Meats.

There are only so many old-style, independent butchers left in Red Bank.

Humanbitesrbg There’s Ralph ‘Johnny Jazz‘ Gatta on Shrewsbury Avenue, of course, working the chopping block for some 60 years. The guys at Citarella’s Meats & Deli on Prospect Avenue. And smack in between them, Stew Goldstein of Monmouth Meats, on Monmouth Street opposite the Count Basie Theatre.

A Brooklyn native who now lives in East Brunswick, Goldstein, 53, has been in the trade since he was a teenager. And to revive its long-dormant Human Bites feature, redbankgreen took a few minutes recently to ask Goldstein about a lifetime of swing a meat cleaver.

Did you always know this is what you wanted to do for a living?

Yes. I never had any other jobs. This is what I enjoy. My father had a small family-style neighborhood store in downtown Brooklyn. He was in business for about 45 years.


Do you remember your first interaction with a side of beef?

My first interaction was when I was maybe eight, nine years old. I went to the wholesale market with my father.


What was that experience like for a kid?
You walk into a huge, refrigerated warehouse. The floor was wet and dirty — things weren’t as clean as they are now. You had the carcasses, you got the smells. It was something I said I would never do. But I did. I knew nothing else.


Read More »

MARKING ANOTHER CENTURY OF EARTH DAYS

Img_4532Bob Sickles Sr. riding high on his 1948 John Deere MT tractor.

Eighty years old, and with a still-thick crop of hair, Bob Sickles Sr. sits at his son Bob’s desk and picks through a boxful of documents in his lap, many of them bearing the swooping calligraphy of ages past.

There are diaries, certificates, courtship letters — items that, while quaintly formal by today’s standards, convey an astonishing sense of intimacy with people long dead, their times relegated to history lessons.

“I have some letters that are 200 years old in this box,” Sickles says. Though he grew up in the house in whose attic his daughter Virginia collected them two summers ago, he’d never really looked at them, he says, and “there’s still more up there.”

The box came out because redbankgreen had dropped by to get the elder Sickle’s thoughts on the family centennial of the farm in Little Silver.

But in context, that milestone is easily dwarfed by the fact that this is only the latest century of an agricultural endeavor now in its fourth.

Read More »